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Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point

From Draftsperson.net

(HACCP). The seven principles defined by the joint FAO/WHO Food Standards Program of the Codex Alimentarius Commission, Twentieth Session Geneva.

A structured system of analysis of hazards which identifies methods of hazard monitoring and control measures for each hazard.

HACCP is a risk management methodology used by the food and related industries for the control of food safety hazards to acceptable risk levels. HACCP principles have been adopted all over the world, particularly in the USA, Europe, The Far East and Australasia. Increasingly, HACCP is becoming an important feature in the import/export process. It is recognized by all countries as the best method of food risk management.

The general principles of HACCP are as follows:

  • HACCP PRINCIPLE 1 - HAZARD ANALYSIS

Hazards (biological, chemical, and physical) are conditions which may pose an unacceptable health risk to the consumer. The significant hazards associated with each specific step of the manufacturing process should be addressed as part of this design. Preventive measures (temperature, pH, moisture level, etc.) to control the noted hazards have been included in this design OR the client has accepted that they will be responsible for the supply and implementation of a HACCP system/program/software or procedures.

  • HACCP PRINCIPLE 2 - IDENTIFY CRITICAL CONTROL POINTS

Critical Control Points (CCP) are steps at which control can be applied and a food safety hazard can be prevented, eliminated or reduced to acceptable levels.

  • HACCP PRINCIPLE 3 - ESTABLISH CRITICAL LIMITS

All CCP's must have preventive measures which are measurable! Critical limits are the operational boundaries of the CCPs which control the food safety hazard(s). The criteria for the critical limits are determined ahead of time in consultation with competent authorities. If the critical limit criteria are not met, the process is "out of control", thus the food safety hazard(s) are not being prevented, eliminated, or reduced to acceptable levels.

  • HACCP PRINCIPLE 4 - MONITOR THE CCP's

Monitoring is a planned sequence of measurements or observations to ensure the product or process is in control (critical limits are being met). It allows processors to assess trends before a loss of control occurs. Adjustments can be made while continuing the process. The monitoring interval must be adequate to ensure reliable control of the process.

  • HACCP PRINCIPLE 5 - ESTABLISH CORRECTIVE ACTION

HACCP is intended to prevent product or process deviations. However, should loss of control occur, there must be definite steps in place for disposition of the product and for correction of the process. These must be pre-planned and written.

  • HACCP PRINCIPLE 6 - RECORD KEEPING

The HACCP system requires the preparation and maintenance of a written HACCP plan together with other documentation. This must include all records generated during the monitoring of each CCP and notations of corrective actions taken. Usually, the simplest record keeping system possible to ensure effectiveness is the most desirable.

  • HACCP PRINCIPLE 7 - VERIFICATION

Verification has several steps. The scientific or technical validity of the hazard analysis and the adequacy of the CCP's should be documented. Verification of the effectiveness of the HACCP plan is also necessary. The system should be subject to periodic revalidation using independent audits or other verification procedures.


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